ABA Policy on the ICC

ABA Policy on the ICC

The elected 560-member American Bar Association (ABA) House of Delegates has ultimate responsibility for establishing the Association’s policy on professional and public issues. Twice a year, the House debates and votes on proposed policies. Once passed, the ABA can publically advocate for those policies, such as by issuing ABA Presidential Statements.

Since its 1978 policy endorsing the creation of a permanent international criminal tribunal, the ABA has passed multiple policies supportive of the International Criminal Court (ICC). These policy positions have advocated for the adoption of the Rome Statute (the multilateral treaty that established the ICC) and urged the U.S. to become a State Party to the ICC. Most recently, the ABA urged the U.S. government to forge greater support for, and engagement with, the ICC.